It was just about a year ago, in my Obligatory Year End Post that I highlighted Twitter as a service that I wish would die. Well, fast forward 50 weeks, and I am a regular tweeter (@timkilroy). I have TweetDeck on my laptop and Twinkle on my iPhone. In fact, Twitter has become a more emotionally important mobile activity than e-mail. (E-mail is usually about work, and Twitter is an active conversation. Frankly, Twitter just appeals to the AAD monkey in my head that is constantly looking for some great, interesting thing to ponder.)


Twitter, especially in its mobile component, allows me the opportunity to engage with folks in the UK, Egypt, SF, wherever. I suddenly have conversations with an incredibly diverse array of folks. I have had questions answered about Drupal , had conversations about Dustin Pedroia , and learned of a friend’s major life event via Twitter. It is more real-time than Facebook, more conversational that e-mail, and more diverse than you might find on a single focus chat board (like AppleInsider or something).


I think the change for me has come from the growth in population on Twitter. There is enough of an audience for Twitter to be a tool, for Twitter to become a community, and for Twitter to take on a customizable voice. Most of the folks that I follow are talking about their interests, their professional opinions, and the exciting discoveries that they make. It has become a critical information for me. Frankly, when Twitter goes down, I am depressed. I miss the constant stream of conversation. 


Twitter is definitely NOT on my list of services that ought to die. I want to add more voices to the conversation!

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